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Dior consolidates itself once again as one of the most awaited shows and one that gives more to talk about each Fashion Week.

Dior FW19

The Rodin Museum was the chosen setting for the firm’s FW19 collection. The decoration featured the letters “DIOR” on the entrance, created from naked women (“each one represents a different woman“, according to the Maison). A work by the Italian artist and poet Tomaso Binga. Although, curiously, her name is a male pseudonym in protest against the privileges reserved for this genre: the artist’s real name is Bianca Pucciarelli Menna. And her work already marked the direction in which the show was heading.

The pieces in the collection sought to reconnect with the idea of femininity transcending gender, anatomy and sex. The graphics on the t-shirts featured phrases such as “Sisterhood is global“, a tribute to Robin Morgan‘s works, and a trend that we saw exploded in the public with the unforgettable “Everyone should be feminist” from the SS17 collection.

The models wore elegant hats inspired by the rock and subculture of the post-war Teddy Girls, a series of 1950s and 1960s androgynous codes that transgress the idea of gender. Maria Grazia Chiuri has opted for a rebellious spirit embodied in fabrics such as the tweed of corsets, leather, quilts or tartan. The iconic toile de jouy and the Saddle Bag from Galliano‘s era have also been included in this collection; and, as could not be otherwise, Dior’s favourite new Book Tote has also been present.

DIOR FW19

Chiuri has maintained her characteristic essence by incorporating new, more modern and contemporary elements. An avant-garde, fresh and youthful touch in the skin of powerful and united women. As is now tradition, Dior is once again claiming a feminist message to unite the voice of industry to the fight for women’s rights. But, as has already happened before, we sense that the hottest debate will not be missing: can a luxury Maison, with all that the fashion industry implies, pretend to be a spokesperson for a feminist message?